Brome McCreary was right on time.

The wildlife biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey had arrived at a rendezvous location in the Deschutes National Forest to pick up precious cargo and take it to laboratories in Corvallis.

Spotted Frog

U.S. Fish & Wildlife biologist Jennifer O’Reilly holds a container of spotted frog eggs recently collected from the headwaters of the Deschutes River.

Spotted Frog

A wetland area near the Slough Day Use Area southwest of Bend. The site is one of the areas U.S. Fish & Wildlife biologist Jennifer O’Reilly will check for spotted frog eggs to assess the frog's population.  

Spotted Frog

U.S. Fish & Wildlife biologist Jennifer O’Reilly looks for signs of spotted frog eggs and talks about the conditions in which spotted frogs will lay eggs while in a wetland near the Slough Day Use Area southwest of Bend.  

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Reporter: 541-617-7818, mkohn@bendbulletin.com

Michael Kohn has been public lands and environment reporter with The Bulletin since 2019. He enjoys hiking in the hills and forests near Bend with his family and exploring the state of Oregon.

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